Trail Work

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IMBA Trailbuilding Basics  Apr 18, 2017, 2:00 PM Ken Carpenter
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Common Questions: Constructing Wetland Boardwalks & Trails  Jul 20, 2015, 10:35 AM Ken Carpenter
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Why write another book on planning and designing trails, trailheads, and campgrounds? The answer is simple. Very few of the references now available address the needs of equestrians. This guidebook addresses their needs. It is written with a specific audience in mind--planners, architects, engineers, landscape architects, land managers, equestrian advocates, and private developers who want to create successful recreation opportunities for riders. The emphasis is on highly developed recreation facilities and programs, such as those in urban, rural, and some wildland areas. This guidebook provides practical guidelines for developing recreation environments that are sensitive to the needs of riders and their stock.  Jul 20, 2015, 10:18 AM Ken Carpenter
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Trails in soft, saturated soils present special challenges for trail managers. Muddy trails cause problems for livestock and hikers, both of whom tend to skirt the edges of mud holes. The use along the edge of the trail increases the area being damaged. Improperly constructed trails in wet areas lead to erosion, soil compaction, sedimentation, multiple trails where only one is needed, and unhappy trail users. Traditional trail construction methods for wet areas include turnpike or puncheon. These methods have worked well where rock or wood materials are readily available. However, geosynthetics can increase the effectiveness of construction methods and offer additional alternatives.  Jul 20, 2015, 10:20 AM Ken Carpenter
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A fabric bag for hauling gravel or fill material with packstock is available for Forest Service use. Replacement fill material is often needed for trail work, especially for turnpike construction and tread maintenance. Using packstock to haul gravel or other fill material is practical when motorized equipment is impractical or not allowed.  Jul 20, 2015, 10:21 AM Ken Carpenter
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by John Favro When you construct or reroute a trail, you are putting a structure on the landscape that will be there, in good or bad condition, for 100 years or more in most places. So why not do it right?  Mar 5, 2014, 12:00 PM Ken Carpenter
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  135k v. 1 Mar 29, 2012, 7:19 PM Ken Carpenter
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Why write another trail construction and maintenance guide? Good question. Since publication of the first edition of the "Trail Construction and Maintenance Notebook" in 1996, several excellent books about trail construction and maintenance have been published by the International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA), the Student Conservation Association (SCA), and the Appalachian Mountain Club, among others. At the same time, this notebook has remained popular, especially because of its pocket size and its wide availability through a partnership between the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Federal Highway Administration's Recreational Trails Program.  Jul 20, 2015, 10:23 AM Ken Carpenter
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  Apr 10, 2010, 8:25 PM Ken Carpenter
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Maricopa Trail and Park Foundation Trail Stewardship Program Crew Leader Volunteer Training Manual  May 24, 2017, 12:46 PM Ken Carpenter
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Most experienced trail crews try to avoid wetlands because of the construction and maintenance problems they pose. Little has been published on wetland trail construction, and materials that are available are often outmoded or are too regionally focused. By pulling this information together from our experiences, we hope to answer questions you didn't even know you had. In this manual we have described the common techniques for building a wetland trail. We have also included information on some of the more unusual materials and tools.  Jul 20, 2015, 10:16 AM Ken Carpenter
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  60k v. 1 Apr 12, 2012, 5:42 PM Ken Carpenter
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By Rebecca Gimenez PhD Don't want to buy a trailer to go places? Do you prefer to ride close to your home or maybe you would like to connect to a local trail system? Many owners of horse properties intend to construct horse trails on their own land or want to connect with a private or public trail system. Others want to help maintain trails they often ride in their communities. Here, we will point out trail construction, repair and preservation ideas that will make maintenance of that trail easier for years to come, while protecting the habitats that riders enjoy  Mar 3, 2013, 9:11 AM Ken Carpenter
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